Tag Archive: Productivity gaps

Nov 28

A. How does Germany beat UK at productivity?

Unite, a UK trade union, commissioned a study to establish ‘the most significant reasons for Germany’s high productivity rate’ when compared to the UK The results were: Reason 1 – Skills: Germany has a highly skilled workforce, which their government has invested a lot in: More than 80% have received formal vocational training or possess …

Continue reading »

Oct 15

C. Productivity Commission (Aus) shows the way

Peter Harris, chairman of Australia’s Productivity Commission (PC), was interviewed on the airwaves today The purpose of the APC is to deal with problems that the Government finds too hard – too difficult to solve – based on a fact-based analysis And it’s most important that their views are accepted as being independent The process they …

Continue reading »

Sep 22

A. UK management skills lacking

Alexandra Frean, a business columnist of The Times, claims: “The most accessible solution to Britain’s low-productivity problem is the presence in virtually every workplace of accidental managers” i.e. people who are promoted to positions quite different to past jobs where they did well She says they cannot be thrown in at the deep end – …

Continue reading »

Sep 02

C. Regional development needed

Several top business leaders are now pushing for government development of the regions as the best way to get UK productivity out of the current doldrums, back on track and closing the gap with the rest of the G7 In particular, they focus on the need to greatly improve public transport within, not between, those …

Continue reading »

Aug 06

C. MGI assess the productivity puzzle

McKinsey & Co, in particular the MGI (McKinsey Global Institute), opened their recent ‘discussion paper’ on the productivity puzzle afflicting the USA (and other developed economies) by stating: “Now, as low birth rates slow the expansion of the labour force, increasing productivity, the output we get from every hour worked, is more crucial than ever …

Continue reading »

Jul 11

B. Digital investment for productivity

An interesting article from IoT Agenda explores why digital investment in increasingly capable devices/ things/ solutions are empowering businesses to transform their processes and workflows but not showing up in real productivity gains One theory is ‘the metrics used are suspect’ – however, the author sides with another The rapid evolution in transformative technologies (e.g. …

Continue reading »

Jun 29

B. Hi/ Lo productivity for Hi/ Lo wages

It’s a nation’s mix of sectors that largely determines its overall productivity and prosperity levels And some sectors are much more productive than others For example, the UK has some highly productive sectors such as manufacturing which are continually improving their (labour) productivity levels by investing in latest technology such as robotics, automation, IoTand AI …

Continue reading »

Jun 28

B. AI the next GPT?

PWC – Price Waterhouse Coopers, the management consultancy – claim global GDP will be some 14% higher in 2030 as a result of AI – Artificial Intelligence This is equivalent to an extra $15.7 trillion The greatest gains will be realised in China and North America Anand Rao, global leader of AI at PWC says: …

Continue reading »

Jun 22

C. Political parties’ productivity plans

Productivity is the biggest peacetime issue facing all UK political parties – annual improvements are vital if living standards and average earnings are to be raised – so what did their recent manifestos say about it? Conservative Manifesto: Introduce a National Productivity Investment Fund – to spend £23bn by the end of the next parliament …

Continue reading »

May 15

A. National productivity positions built on sand

On Friday, 12 May, 2017, I read an article about Chinese productivity posted by Bloomberg journalist Michael Schuman and sent him the following email: Michael, I read your article about Chinese productivity with great interest The first step in any major productivity improvement drive is indeed to establish the current position – where are you now? Most …

Continue reading »

Older posts «