Dick-Smythe-10151

Author's details

Date registered: February 28, 2017

Biography

Dick Smythe was educated at Bolton School, graduated in pure mathematics and statistics at St Andrews University and then took a masters in Operations Research at Birmingham University • He became a Fellow of the Royal Statistical Society, Operational Research Society, Institute of Management Services and the Institute of Physical Distribution Management • His career started with a scholarship from Dorman Long Steel on Teesside, working shifts on blast furnaces and steel mills before graduating and, afterwards, in their OR department – he subsequently moved to London to join the world-famous BISRA OR department, then part of British Steel, and was involved in their corporate planning and cost reduction programmes • During these earlier years, he became an officer in the Royal Naval Reserve, serving on their coastal minesweepers, and a wing forward for Rosslyn Park RFC (n'th XV), playing mostly for their famed après-rugby • He was then recruited by Europe's leading consultancy of the day, PA Consulting Group, and went on to set up and grow their Productivity Services Division into a significant part of the business, becoming a PA director and sitting on their UK management consultancy board - whilst there, he led a joint study with the CBI into UK productivity, and presented the results on TV, radio and to the national press with Director General Sir John Banham - The Times leader commented: "It is refreshing to come across something that has its feet firmly planted on the ground" • Since then, he has mixed productivity consultancy work with playing the property and stock markets, skippering his own boat in the Fastnet and many other ocean yacht races and keeping his golf handicap down to single figures • He is happily married, has two sons and two grandchildren to date, and lives either by the Solent or at Marble Arch in London

Latest posts

  1. New technology for improved productivity  — May 20, 2018
  2. Freelancing is good for most — May 19, 2018
  3. UK works longer hours than EU — May 19, 2018
  4. Mental world – Changes ahead? — May 7, 2018
  5. The bullsh**t job phenomenon — May 5, 2018

Most commented posts

  1. Energy unlimited — 2 comments
  2. Unconventional meetings — 1 comment
  3. Future lives of leisure, not work? — 1 comment
  4. Mongrel, not pedigree, leaders needed now — 1 comment
  5. Likely impacts of automation — 1 comment

Author's posts listings

Apr 12

Beware taking the IT plunge

Professor John Seddon, CEO of Vanguard Consultants (with whom I have no connection, only admiration) has just issued the following wake-up call for business leaders investing in the digital bandwagon The Big Consultancies (mea culpa – I was once a member of one of them – Ed.) too often peddle unnecessarily complex solutions to business …

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Apr 05

Time to change time at work

An interesting article by Business Leader columnist James Phipps, a ‘serial entrepreneur and investor’ and Exec Chairman of the Excalibur Group, about effective ways to improve employee productivity  We see relatively little about how to improve the awful productivity we have in the UK. We in the UK have a business culture which says you …

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Apr 02

International trends for main sectors

As economies develop, their three main sectors – agriculture, manufacturing and services – tend to follow specific patterns: The agriculture sector shrinks The manufacturing sector grows initially, and then begins to decline in favour of the services sector The services sector grows In particular, a study of trends in 24 countries over the period 2000-14 …

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Apr 01

Absentee leaders are worst of all

 A surprising insight by Scott Gregory, CEO of Hogan Assessment Systems, was recently published in the prestigious Harvard Business Review – extracts follow ______________________________________________________ A young friend recently remarked that the worst boss he ever had would provide him with feedback that always consisted of “you’re doing a great job” but they both knew it wasn’t true — …

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Mar 28

Higher wages lead to higher productivity

According to Marshall Auerback, a market analyst and commentator, after a year-long analysis of seven developed countries and six sectors, global management consultancy company McKinsey reported that: “Demand matters for productivity growth and increasing demand is key to restarting growth across advanced economies.”  The report by James Manyika, Jaana Remes and Jan Mischke was published in the Harvard Business …

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