Category: 19. CI

Productivity improvement must involve all employees

The following are extracts from an article in the Huffingtom Post by Mike Clancy, General secretary of Prospect – one must involve all employees, all the time, for effective productivity improvement The UK is not productive enough and we do not share wealth widely enough: Unemployment may be historically low but public satisfaction with the economy …

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Nigeria seeks CI benefits – the West ignores them!

The Japanese government via their METI (Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry) and the JPC (Japanese Productivity Centre) are collaborating with the Nigeria NPC (National Productivity Centre) to improve productivity in that country’s manufacturing sector with the aim of ‘boosting economic development and standard of living’ The NPC Director-General, Dr Kashim Akor, said: “The ultimate goal …

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Japan pushes CI into Africa

The Japanese government, via the JPC (Japan Productivity Centre) is helping African companies on their productivity journey by adopting Kaizen (aka CI – Continuous Improvement) and lean management techniques At first, they selected three Model Companies in Africa – Japanese experts trained their middle managers and supervisors – then productivity improvements were sought The results were …

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Continuous productivity improvement

Gerard Lyons, Chief economist at Netwealth, quoted a report from the Centre for Economic Justice: “There is no magical solution to low productivity – instead, marginal improvements can make a difference” Malcolm Gladwell, in his book Outliers, said you can master anything so long as you practise it for 10,000 hours – but make the same …

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Great performers use CI

There’s a direct read-across between how the best in business emulate the best in sport In an article in The Times, Matthew Syed asks ‘What separates greats from wasted talents?’: “Great athletes are hyper-confident – they don’t believe they have any weaknesses – they cannot be beaten – they’re already perfect and so cannot continually improve” …

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